September 13, 2013

vasta:

David and Ben Crystal perform selections from Shakespeare in the original accent, as it would have been heard at the Globe in the early 1600s.

i’m down with OP

August 3, 2013
jakealoo:

A wonderful photo that’s about to be immortalized in sculpture:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/07/23/bc-wait-for-me-daddy.html


i’d like to see that.

jakealoo:

A wonderful photo that’s about to be immortalized in sculpture:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/07/23/bc-wait-for-me-daddy.html

i’d like to see that.

(via oldcanada)

July 24, 2013

#royalbaby is newest member of boyband, gorgeous georgians. 

June 4, 2013
fyeah-history:

Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden on Dec. 12, 1957

fyeah-history:

Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden on Dec. 12, 1957

(via oldcanada)

February 28, 2013

from Horrible Histories: The Terrible Tudors by Terry Deary & Neil Tonge

i miss horrible histories. this is the only good tudor song too.

from Horrible Histories: The Terrible Tudors by Terry Deary & Neil Tonge

i miss horrible histories. this is the only good tudor song too.

(via professah-rivah-song)

December 26, 2012
old history note. this one is a keeper.

old history note. this one is a keeper.

5:56pm
(View comments  
Filed under: world war 1 history europe war 
October 4, 2012
steve lacy played soprano saxophone in thelonious monk’s quintet for 16 weeks in 1960. he took down the pianist’s advice in a spiral notebook.

steve lacy played soprano saxophone in thelonious monk’s quintet for 16 weeks in 1960. he took down the pianist’s advice in a spiral notebook.

August 24, 2012
the only anatole i had heard was the cook from the p.g. wodehouse’s jeeves and wooster series. turns out it may be the birth place of indo-european languages as well.
(image leads to source and story)

the only anatole i had heard was the cook from the p.g. wodehouse’s jeeves and wooster series. turns out it may be the birth place of indo-european languages as well.

(image leads to source and story)

August 21, 2012

droodkin:

 World Battleground, 1000 years of war in 5 minutes

This animation shows all important battles that took place over the last ten centuries. The sizes of the explosions and labels are proportional to the number of casualties. The music is “Ride Of The Valkyries” by Richard Wagner. The data comes from the wikipedia article, List of Battles.


Most of the activity seems to happen in Europe, this is because the english wikipedia was used.

just the “important” ones. ah well, still cool as the coolest thing ever.

(Source: dustyhistory)

August 2, 2012
from futility closet


Testimony of Alexander Falconbridge before a select committee of the House of Commons, March 8, 1790:
What is your present situation?A surgeon.
How many voyages have you been to the Coast of Africa?I have been four voyages to the Coast of Africa.
Do you examine the Slaves previous to purchasing them?They are always examined by some officers on board; it is generally understood to be the surgeon’s business.
Do they appear dejected when brought on board?All that I have seen in my voyages did appear so.
Did this dejection continue, or did it soon wear off?With some it continued the whole voyage, and with others till death put a period to their misery.
Have you known instances of Slaves refusing sustenance?I have known several instances.
With what design?With a design to starve themselves, I am persuaded. …
What was the mode used in stowing the Slaves in their night apartments?They had not so much room as a man has in his coffin, neither in length or breadth, and it was impossible for them to turn or shift with any degree of ease. I have had occasion very often to go from one side of their rooms to the other; before I attempted it I have always taken off my shoes, and notwithstanding I have trod with as much care as I possibly could to prevent pinching them, it has unavoidably happened that I did so; I have often had my feet bit and scratched by them, the marks of which I have now. …
Are the consequences ever extremely noxious and nauseous of great number being ill at once of this latter disorder [dysentery]?
It was the case in the Alexander, as I have said before when I was taken ill — I cannot conceive any situation so dreadful and disgusting, the deck was covered with blood and mucus, and approached nearer to the resemblance of a slaughter-house than anything I can compare it to, the stench and foul air were likewise intolerable. …
To what cause do you describe [instances of insanity among slaves on board ship]?To their being torn from their nearest connections, and carried away from their country.

from futility closet

Testimony of Alexander Falconbridge before a select committee of the House of Commons, March 8, 1790:

What is your present situation?
A surgeon.

How many voyages have you been to the Coast of Africa?
I have been four voyages to the Coast of Africa.

Do you examine the Slaves previous to purchasing them?
They are always examined by some officers on board; it is generally understood to be the surgeon’s business.

Do they appear dejected when brought on board?
All that I have seen in my voyages did appear so.

Did this dejection continue, or did it soon wear off?
With some it continued the whole voyage, and with others till death put a period to their misery.

Have you known instances of Slaves refusing sustenance?
I have known several instances.

With what design?
With a design to starve themselves, I am persuaded. …

What was the mode used in stowing the Slaves in their night apartments?
They had not so much room as a man has in his coffin, neither in length or breadth, and it was impossible for them to turn or shift with any degree of ease. I have had occasion very often to go from one side of their rooms to the other; before I attempted it I have always taken off my shoes, and notwithstanding I have trod with as much care as I possibly could to prevent pinching them, it has unavoidably happened that I did so; I have often had my feet bit and scratched by them, the marks of which I have now. …

Are the consequences ever extremely noxious and nauseous of great number being ill at once of this latter disorder [dysentery]?

It was the case in the Alexander, as I have said before when I was taken ill — I cannot conceive any situation so dreadful and disgusting, the deck was covered with blood and mucus, and approached nearer to the resemblance of a slaughter-house than anything I can compare it to, the stench and foul air were likewise intolerable. …

To what cause do you describe [instances of insanity among slaves on board ship]?
To their being torn from their nearest connections, and carried away from their country.

July 19, 2012

this is the only way i’ll learn anything anymore. 

July 19, 2012
ontario first nations map

ontario first nations map

July 19, 2012
Traveling Companions

In 1848, Ellen and William Craft resolved to flee slavery, but they needed a way to get from Macon, Ga., to the free states in the north. William could never travel such a distance alone, but Ellen’s skin was fair enough that she could pass for white. So she disguised herself as a white male cotton planter attended by William, her slave. (She had to pose as a man because a white woman would not have traveled alone with a male slave.)

read this crazy (true) story of a couple’s escape to freedom.

July 10, 2012
because we can’t have blind chicken running around like…headless…
theoddmentemporium:

A 1903 patent for eye protection for chickens:

‘This invention relates to eye-protectors, and more particularly to eye-protectors designed for fowls, so that they may be protected from other fowls that might attempt to peck them…’ [Source]

because we can’t have blind chicken running around like…headless…

theoddmentemporium:

A 1903 patent for eye protection for chickens:

‘This invention relates to eye-protectors, and more particularly to eye-protectors designed for fowls, so that they may be protected from other fowls that might attempt to peck them…’ [Source]

July 3, 2012
lordclaremorris:

The German Army’s invasion of the Balkans in the spring and summer of 1941. Contrary to popular belief, there was very little mountain fighting in the Balkans, as the Germans invaded Yugoslavia from three directions following the river valleys into the heart of the Kingdom. They were able to use Panzers in the same scale as in Poland or France despite the change in topography. The Germans completely avoided the mountains of Western Yugoslavia and the mountains of Greece, as they took the Vardar right into the Kingdom of Greece as well, unlike the Italians who attempted to fight their way through the mountains of Epirus on the Albanian border. Using flat river valleys, the advantage of attacking from multiple directions, and their superiority in both doctrine and mechanised forces, the Germans destroyed both Greece and Yugoslavia in 3 weeks with very little mountain fighting. Meaning that the mountains were useless for defence. Afterwards of course they became problematic with guerrilla fighting, but the initial invasion and the destruction of the regular Greek and Yugoslav Armies was achieved swiftly and easily. I say this because I had an opponent in an argument who imagined that an invasion of Spain would end the same as the invasion of the Balkans. This ignores geography. First off, the Germans could only invade Spain from one direction, not three. But most importantly, the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula run East-West and thus throw up repeated barriers to any invader, which they MUST cross. There are no rivers that slice valleys through the Sierra Morena or the Sierra de Alcubierre. The only way to cross them is up and over. Which would be difficult for armour, slowing the Germans down. The rivers also generally flow East to West, the largest ones anyway, emptying into the Atlantic, though the Ebro flows West to East, into the Mediterranean. So the river valleys would just shoot the Germans sideways, instead of into the heart of Spain. They’d be useless. Thus despite both being mountainous, Spain would be infinitely more difficult to invade than the Balkans, and the experiences would be completely different. One ignores geography at their own peril.


just a neat new piece of information for the morning.

lordclaremorris:

The German Army’s invasion of the Balkans in the spring and summer of 1941. Contrary to popular belief, there was very little mountain fighting in the Balkans, as the Germans invaded Yugoslavia from three directions following the river valleys into the heart of the Kingdom. They were able to use Panzers in the same scale as in Poland or France despite the change in topography. The Germans completely avoided the mountains of Western Yugoslavia and the mountains of Greece, as they took the Vardar right into the Kingdom of Greece as well, unlike the Italians who attempted to fight their way through the mountains of Epirus on the Albanian border. Using flat river valleys, the advantage of attacking from multiple directions, and their superiority in both doctrine and mechanised forces, the Germans destroyed both Greece and Yugoslavia in 3 weeks with very little mountain fighting. Meaning that the mountains were useless for defence. Afterwards of course they became problematic with guerrilla fighting, but the initial invasion and the destruction of the regular Greek and Yugoslav Armies was achieved swiftly and easily. I say this because I had an opponent in an argument who imagined that an invasion of Spain would end the same as the invasion of the Balkans. This ignores geography. First off, the Germans could only invade Spain from one direction, not three. But most importantly, the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula run East-West and thus throw up repeated barriers to any invader, which they MUST cross. There are no rivers that slice valleys through the Sierra Morena or the Sierra de Alcubierre. The only way to cross them is up and over. Which would be difficult for armour, slowing the Germans down. The rivers also generally flow East to West, the largest ones anyway, emptying into the Atlantic, though the Ebro flows West to East, into the Mediterranean. So the river valleys would just shoot the Germans sideways, instead of into the heart of Spain. They’d be useless. Thus despite both being mountainous, Spain would be infinitely more difficult to invade than the Balkans, and the experiences would be completely different. One ignores geography at their own peril.

just a neat new piece of information for the morning.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

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